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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:01 pm 
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Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:10 pm 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.

How high is the deductible?

Why are you in? Insurance rates that were supposed to go down because your boy said so not happening?

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:26 pm 
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HokieHam wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.

How high is the deductible?

Why are you in? Insurance rates that were supposed to go down because your boy said so not happening?



Deductible is $2500. As I understand it, firm is putting up $1500 and I'm paying $282 per month. $5000 out of pocket maximum. As I understand it, everything is covered from 0-$1500 and 5000+, but I'm not really sure.

If I don't go to the doctor, I come out ahead.

I wasn't going to bring up the failure of Trump and Congressional Republicans to do anything to fix our healthcare system.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:34 pm 
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I am in one and I love it.

My premiums are a fraction of what the standard group plan is here. I pay everything out of a health savings account up to $3500 a year, then it's a 80/20 share to $6k. Contributions to the HSA are pre-tax and it does not expire like an FSA.

Been in the plan for 3 years and have saved (difference between what I would have paid in premiums and co-pays vs what I paid in premiums and actual payments) over $3,500 as a result. At this point I don't need to even contribute to the HSA because the three years have built up enough to cover my yearly out of pocket max for more than 2 years.

It works because the consumer views it as their money and makes better choices than a traditional co-pay program.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:55 pm 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
HokieHam wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.

How high is the deductible?

Why are you in? Insurance rates that were supposed to go down because your boy said so not happening?



Deductible is $2500. As I understand it, firm is putting up $1500 and I'm paying $282 per month. $5000 out of pocket maximum. As I understand it, everything is covered from 0-$1500 and 5000+, but I'm not really sure.

If I don't go to the doctor, I come out ahead.

I wasn't going to bring up the failure of Trump and Congressional Republicans to do anything to fix our healthcare system.


I have basically the same thing (and have had it since before Obamacare). This is pretty common nowadays. Yes, you are correct as you describe the plan (you pay nothing for the first $1500 and come out ahead if you rarely go to the doctor).

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:08 pm 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:13 pm 
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cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


2,500 is for a single employee, nobody else. That is the way they describe it.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:33 pm 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


2,500 is for a single employee, nobody else. That is the way they describe it.


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Right. That is a High-deductible plan according to the IRS.

Access to an HSA is a huge benefit. It can double as a retirement account if you contribute more money than you use - there's no penalty for non-medical withdrawals at retirement age and most HSAs have investment options.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:36 pm 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


2,500 is for a single employee, nobody else. That is the way they describe it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


yes, that deductible is the normal one now and most plans are higher than that. I have been setting up yearly health benefits for over 20 years. First it started with not paying 100% of the premium, employee pays some, now that many plans are approaching 50% employee portion of the premium or even higher your only option is to bump the deductible and max out of pocket (co-pay) to keep the premium expense to the company at a decent level.

That is why I laugh at your strident support of national health care and people that say you can cut a ton of costs out of the H/C system to make the premiums decrease..... in reality who takes the cut as nobody involved will and the reality is it takes dollars to get a med degree, to make new drugs and to run very large facilities


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:40 pm 
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cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


2,500 is for a single employee, nobody else. That is the way they describe it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


yes, that deductible is the normal one now and most plans are higher than that. I have been setting up yearly health benefits for over 20 years. First it started with not paying 100% of the premium, employee pays some, now that many plans are approaching 50% employee portion of the premium or even higher your only option is to bump the deductible and max out of pocket (co-pay) to keep the premium expense to the company at a decent level.

That is why I laugh at your strident support of national health care and people that say you can cut a ton of costs out of the H/C system to make the premiums decrease..... in reality who takes the cut as nobody involved will and the reality is it takes dollars to get a med degree, to make new drugs and to run very large facilities


Don’t follow, but OK.


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"Leadership: Whatever happens, you're responsible. If it doesn't happen, you're responsible." - DT(2013)

"We're not going to own it. I'm not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it." - DT(2017)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 5:16 pm 
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ieatbacon wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


2,500 is for a single employee, nobody else. That is the way they describe it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Right. That is a High-deductible plan according to the IRS.

Access to an HSA is a huge benefit. It can double as a retirement account if you contribute more money than you use - there's no penalty for non-medical withdrawals at retirement age and most HSAs have investment options.


Thank you for this. And you take your contribution with you if you leave your job, right? Like an 401(k). That's what I'm hearing.

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"We're not going to own it. I'm not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it." - DT(2017)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 5:28 pm 
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It makes sense if you're young/healthy (and most importantly - no kids) and can afford a monster deductible worst case.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 6:24 pm 
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USN_Hokie wrote:
It makes sense if you're young/healthy (and most importantly - no kids) and can afford a monster deductible worst case.


I agree.

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"Leadership: Whatever happens, you're responsible. If it doesn't happen, you're responsible." - DT(2013)

"We're not going to own it. I'm not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it." - DT(2017)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:08 pm 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
HokieHam wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.

How high is the deductible?

Why are you in? Insurance rates that were supposed to go down because your boy said so not happening?



Deductible is $2500. As I understand it, firm is putting up $1500 and I'm paying $282 per month. $5000 out of pocket maximum. As I understand it, everything is covered from 0-$1500 and 5000+, but I'm not really sure.

If I don't go to the doctor, I come out ahead.

I wasn't going to bring up the failure of Trump and Congressional Republicans to do anything to fix our healthcare system.

We changed from an insurance plan based on just our company to signing up with ADP. It’s a much larger pool. I pay $1 a month but my deductible is $6,500. Unfortunately since 2015, I was diagnosed with a pretty bad disease that came close to ending HokieHam. It’s under control now but it’s done it’s damage.

My worry is for my family. The premiums for a family are $1,683.00/month. Who can afford that? So they have crap insurance and I can only hope they stay relatively healthy. We are looking into Direct Primary Healthcare. That seems really promising. Keep your beloved government out of it altogether.

Republicans are morons. They don’t march lock step like the jackbooted Dems.......

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:19 pm 
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ieatbacon wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
cwtcr hokie wrote:
ip_law-hokie wrote:
Not exactly sure how it works, but I'm in for 2018.


not sure what you had before but that is not high deductible, that is lower to standard these days. A true high deductible plan has like a 7,500 or higher deductible with a higher max out of pocket, for those of us that do not go to the doctor much or ever it is awesome as the premiums are a ton lower. Of course Obummercare wiped out almost all of those plans.

A combined $ 5-10k max out of pocket total is standard these days


2,500 is for a single employee, nobody else. That is the way they describe it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk




Right. That is a High-deductible plan according to the IRS.

Access to an HSA is a huge benefit. It can double as a retirement account if you contribute more money than you use - there's no penalty for non-medical withdrawals at retirement age and most HSAs have investment options.



Yep, there’s a simple table that lists the minimum deductible and max out of pocket for single/family.
It’s only been around for 13-14 years, so understandable why it’s confusing. :roll:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:25 pm 
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USN_Hokie wrote:
It makes sense if you're young/healthy (and most importantly - no kids) and can afford a monster deductible worst case.

Kids make it expensive no mater what. We actually had a pretty god plan last year, $1,500 per month for a family of 4, zero deductible, $5k max out of pocket. We didn’t even get close to the max.
This year, that goes up to $2,100/month. :shock:
So now, we’ve got to decide if we want to try and stick with the same premium and risk the higher deductible that comes with it. Ocare roulette, spin the wheel and take your chances.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:05 am 
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HokieFanDC wrote:
USN_Hokie wrote:
It makes sense if you're young/healthy (and most importantly - no kids) and can afford a monster deductible worst case.

Kids make it expensive no mater what. We actually had a pretty god plan last year, $1,500 per month for a family of 4, zero deductible, $5k max out of pocket. We didn’t even get close to the max.
This year, that goes up to $2,100/month. :shock:
So now, we’ve got to decide if we want to try and stick with the same premium and risk the higher deductible that comes with it. Ocare roulette, spin the wheel and take your chances.


Spin the wheel.


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"We're not going to own it. I'm not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it." - DT(2017)


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:41 am 
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IP, worth noting is that if your employer provides you with an FSA (that's what it's called when your employer pays the first $1500 of your deductible), you are ineligible for an HSA. I detest that rule passionately. If my employer simply gave me the contribution in cash, then I could filter all of my medical expenses through an HSA using pre-tax dollars. My wife is able to have an HSA, but next year her employer is going to the same kind of plan you have ... except that they are only paying a measly $500. So because they are paying that $500, she can't filter everything through an HSA any more.

(Obviously, the employer prefers to not just give you the $1500 because if your employees are mostly 20-somethings and maybe up to mid-30s, they are going to spend well under the $1500. With an FSA, the employer gets to keep the unused amount, whereas with an HSA, it's your money to either use for medical expenses in the future or roll over into something else.)

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 8:24 am 
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BigDave wrote:
IP, worth noting is that if your employer provides you with an FSA (that's what it's called when your employer pays the first $1500 of your deductible), you are ineligible for an HSA. I detest that rule passionately. If my employer simply gave me the contribution in cash, then I could filter all of my medical expenses through an HSA using pre-tax dollars. My wife is able to have an HSA, but next year her employer is going to the same kind of plan you have ... except that they are only paying a measly $500. So because they are paying that $500, she can't filter everything through an HSA any more.

(Obviously, the employer prefers to not just give you the $1500 because if your employees are mostly 20-somethings and maybe up to mid-30s, they are going to spend well under the $1500. With an FSA, the employer gets to keep the unused amount, whereas with an HSA, it's your money to either use for medical expenses in the future or roll over into something else.)


You sure about the first part? I get 1500 from employer and I signed up for 100 a month for the HSA.(?).

Beats me. Insurance policies and regulations are more complex than our tax code.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 8:45 am 
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This is where we miss 80... wasn't he in that field?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:16 am 
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RiverguyVT wrote:
This is where we miss 80... wasn't he in that field?


He was in the field of throwing temper tantrums if he disagreed with you.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:33 am 
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ip_law-hokie wrote:
BigDave wrote:
IP, worth noting is that if your employer provides you with an FSA (that's what it's called when your employer pays the first $1500 of your deductible), you are ineligible for an HSA. I detest that rule passionately. If my employer simply gave me the contribution in cash, then I could filter all of my medical expenses through an HSA using pre-tax dollars. My wife is able to have an HSA, but next year her employer is going to the same kind of plan you have ... except that they are only paying a measly $500. So because they are paying that $500, she can't filter everything through an HSA any more.

(Obviously, the employer prefers to not just give you the $1500 because if your employees are mostly 20-somethings and maybe up to mid-30s, they are going to spend well under the $1500. With an FSA, the employer gets to keep the unused amount, whereas with an HSA, it's your money to either use for medical expenses in the future or roll over into something else.)


You sure about the first part? I get 1500 from employer and I signed up for 100 a month for the HSA.(?).

Beats me. Insurance policies and regulations are more complex than our tax code.


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Yes. Please see https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p969.pdf

On page 4, one of the requirements is "Other employee health plans. An employee covered by an HDHP and a health FSA or an HRA that pays or reimburses qualified medical expenses generally can’t make contributions to an HSA. Health FSAs and HRAs are discussed later."

(And actually, what I have called an FSA apparently the IRS calls an HRA. If your employer pays for it and doesn't deduct it from your salary, it's an HRA. If your employer deducts the contributions from your salary, it's an FSA.)

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